Also by Ann

 

Discovering the Unknown Landscape:  A History of America’s Wetlands

WINNER OF THE AMERICAN
HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION’S
HERBERT FEIS AWARD

for best book by an independent scholar or public historian

WINNER OF THE AMERICAN
SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL
HISTORY GEORGE PERKINS
MARSH PRIZE
for the best
environmental history book

What people have said about Discovering the Unknown Landscape:

“…a major addition to the literature of American environmental history.
    —Roderick Nash, author of Wilderness and the American Mind

“Though I have focused my entire professional career on wetlands, this book provided me with new information, insight, and appreciation of our wetlands resource. There is no student of wetlands that cannot benefit from reading this book.”                                                                                                                

    —Bill O. Wilen, Project Leader, National Wetlands Inventory

“Vileisis gives us the cultural history of America’s wetlands in intricate detail, from Henry David Thoreau, neck deep in a cranberry bog, gaining ‘a sense of the richness of life,’ to senators’ jockeys over the Swamp Land Act in 1849.” —Smithsonian

“ …a fine survey of changing American attitudes towards wetlands, and of the struggles that have been fought for their protection. It will become a standard work on its subject.”

William Cronon, University of Wisconsin, author of Nature’s Metropolis

“A rare book that goes beyond description to contribute to our understanding of the land and of American culture.” —The Chicago Free Press

“A simply first-rate piece of environmental history—comprehensive and careful in its research, well reasoned in its analysis, and exceptionally well-written. Vileisis has provided a model as to how environmental history can markedly enhance how we understand the environmental present and how we think about the future.”

—Samuel P. Hays, Professor Emeritus of History, University of Pittsburgh, author of Beauty, Health, and Permanence

“In this timely, well-documented work, environmental historian Vileisis explains the confusion and contention surrounding wetlands preservation in terms of the differing cultural values Americans have historically assigned to these problematic habitats. . . . From salt marshes of Colonial New England to the recent efforts to restore the Florida Everglades, Vileisis discusses not only the changes in common practices, laws, and regulations but also the shifts in cultural and social attitudes. Highly recommended. . . . “ —Library Journal


Contributions to other books

“Are Tomatoes Natural?” in The Illusory Boundary: Environment and Technology in History, ed. Martin Reuss and Stephen H. Cutcliffe (University of Virginia Press, 2010).

“The Wetland Commons,” in Water and Environment since 1945: Global Perspectives, ed. Char Miller, History in Dispute Series, vol. 7 (Manley, 2001).

“A Day in Teton Marsh Revisited,” in Stories of the Wild, ed. Susan Marsh (Murie Center, 2001).

“Cash Register Rivers,” in The Piracy of America, ed. Judith Scherff (Clarity Press, 1998).